Batcat
Service Maintenance
Technician Page
553rd EMS (later AMS),
553rd FMS and 553rd OMS


The information on this page was originally on the opening Batcat page beginning 06/08/96. As the material increased I decided to move the information to its own page on 02/18/07. This allows for a better method to add additional information, Last Updated 01/27/17.

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553rd EC-121R Maintenance
Keeping the EC-121R's flying
required skilled, experienced
and dedicated service technicians

Batcat EMS FMS OMS

IMPORTANT UPDATE - My wife and I completed the sale of our Maine home and we are now settling into our California home to be nearer our grand children. With this move the only valid email for webmaster Larry Westin is westin@westin553.net - several areas on my Batcat pages continue to show our previous Maine address and phone number. I'm in the process of correcting those areas to show my new contact information, which is Larry Westin, 21721 Verde St., Tehachapi, California 93561, phone (661) 823-4707.

The organizational structure of the 553rd Reconnaissance Wing encompassed two major sections, flying and maintenance, each headed by a Deputy Commander. The Deputy Commander for Material (DCM) oversaw maintenance and supply. To accomplish maintenance the 553rd comprised 3 maintenance squadrons, the Electronic Maintenance Squadron (EMS), which in June 1969 was renamed the Avionics Maintenance Squadron (AMS), the Field Maintenance Squadron (FMS), and the Organizational Maintenance Squadron (OMS). Also under the DCM was Supply and Life Support, although these were not separate squadrons. Without the skill, experience and dedication of this group of Batcat’s, not a single airplane would fly. This page describes the functions of the various maintenance squadrons and units.

In addition the 193rd Tactical Warfare Squadron, Pennsylvania Air National Guard also worked with the 553rd Reconnaissance Wing maintenance technicians to service the EC-121S type Super Constellation aircraft flown by the Pennsylvania ANG while based at Korat RTAFB.


Quick Links to Maintenance Sections

553rd Maintenance Hangar and Shops
Update Maint Images & information
553rd Electronic/Avionics Maintenance Squadron - EMS/AMS
553rd Field Maintenance Squadron - FMS
553rd Organizational Maintenance Squadron - OMS
193rd TWS PA ANG Maintenance


553rd Reconnaissance Wing EMS
in Ground Combat - Purple Heart

While air crews flew combat missions every day, they didn't encounter the enemy directly. Members of the 553rd Electronic Maintenance Squadron (EMS), would soon become the 553rd Avionics Maintenance Squadron (AMS), did encounter the Viet Cong enemy directly while TDY to South Vietnam. Read how TSgt. John Linaburg was wounded at Nui Ba Den mountain. TSgt. John Linaburg, 553rd EMS, was the first and only member of the 553rd Reconnaissance Wing to be awarded the Purple Heart for combat wounds. Article written by 553rd Com Shop OIC Ron Cox. Added 10/18/09. New Images added showing 553rd EMS at Nui Ba Den mountain - Ron Cox sent these after action photographs sapper attack. This image shows SSgt. Saltzen with living quarters on the left, the relay van on the right, B&W, about 117KB. Getting the Damaged Relay Van ready for Airlift back to Korat RTAFB, B&W, about 96KB. A second van on the mountain was the severly damaged maintenance van, B&W, about 162KB. 553rd EMS technicians serviced the equipment in the relay van. While preparing the relay van for airlift back to Korat, this unexploded sapper charge was found! This is the type of explosive charge planted by the Viet Cong to blow up the vans. B&W, about 184KB. This image shows the mountain the Viet Cong climbed to attack the vans, B&W, about 143KB. This image shows the view from the relay van position with its overview of the Mekong Delta. Mekong River in upper part of the image. B&W, about 172KB. My thanks to Ron Cox for sending these photographs. Images Added 11/22/09. My thanks to James F. Geimer, 553rd Avionics Maintenance Squadron, was assigned to the Nui Ba Den mountain installation in June 1969, for the next four images. First two images taken before the VC attack. Mortar site next to living quarters manned by Army. Color about 176K. View of trailers and living quarters from heli pad. Color about 191K. Next two images after the attack. Day 1 after attack, A1C Burdick, a 553rd RMT from Korat. Color abut 162K. Front of living quarters and .50 Cal Mach Gun in sandbag pile. Color about 180K. Added 04/01/11.

The 553rd Maintenance Squadrons
worked from this Hangar and these Shops

Here is a view of the 553rd Maintenance Hangar at Korat. My thanks to Bill Holbrook for providing this photograph to scan. Added 01/30/00, color, about 151K.

A view inside of the Maintenance Hangar looking out at the ramp. My thanks to Bob Langenhan for providing this image. Added 07/05/08, B&W, about 54K. Updated Caption - originally the sheet metal shop was located in a large van, with the completion of the large hangar the sheet metal shop was relocated to the hangar. In this interior view looking out you can see a cowling section in the foreground which typically required crack patching and fastener replacement. The items behind the cowling are from right to left a "Straight Brake" used to making straight edge bends of any angle; aluminum sheet metal storage rack, partial sheet; "Rolling Brake" used to make rounded parts, and the bin for whole sheets of metal. My thanks to Phil Miller for providing this update to the caption. Caption updated 10/03/15.

The 553rd Reconnaissance Wing was a 24 hour a day operation. Here is a night time view of the flight line. My thanks to Bob Rufo for providing his slide for me to scan. Color, about 65K. Added 11/25/13.

Another view inside of the Maintenance Hangar looking out at the ramp with a Connie inside the hangar under repair. My thanks to Ron Hanlin for providing this image. Added 09/04/12, color, about 362K.

The Engine Test Stand used to ground test the Wright R-3350 engines after major work. The 553rd FMS Propeller shop is on the right side of the image. My thanks to Bill Holbrook for lending me this photograph to scan. Added 01/30/00, color, about 206K.

These are the 553rd EMS Squadron Shops at Korat RTAFB. My thanks to Bill Holbrook for sending me the photograph to scan. Added 01/30/00, color, about 151K.

To support the maintenance crews was this Howard Johnsons Snack Bar. OK not really a Howard Johnsons, but that is what it was called. Snack bar was located on the edge of the ramp between the AGE shop and the main hangar. The fellow waiting in line with the white T shirt is my supervisor MSgt Holliday. My thanks to Bill Grosick for this image. Added 01/22/12, B&W, about 138K.

Here is a view of the Batcat Maintenance Truck at Korat RTAFB. My thanks to Tom Sandelin, son of Batcat Thomas Edward Sandelin, for sending me the photograph. Added 04/01/12, color, about 113K.

553rd Electronic Maintenance Squadron, renamed the
553rd Avionics Maintenance Squadron after June 1969

The Electronics Maintenance Squadron (EMS), which was renamed the Avionics Maintenance Squadron (AMS) in June 1969, comprised four branches. One the Electronics Branch, two the Communications Branch, three the Communications and Navigation Branch and four the Electronics and Counter Measures Branch. To accomplish this work each branch was divided into specific shops specializing in a particular electronic equipment. The individual shop areas follow.

553rd Electronic Maintenance Squadron
Automatic Data Relay (ADR) Shop

The ADR equipment was initially maintained by civilians. Here is an image of an ADR under test, civilian technician George Winter from Radiation Inc. servicing. The ADR equipment relayed the sensor data picked up by Batcat EC-121R aircraft to Nakhom Phanom when in line of sight of NKP RTAFB, infiltration center. My thanks to Arley Hamilton, 553rd EMS Communications shop, for this image. B&W, about 128K. My thanks to Jim Romeo for providing Georte Winter's name. Added 02/16/09, updated 08/22/11.

Shown in this image is the first class of USAF Automatic Data Relay Technicians. Image was taken during the first training class at Otis AFB. Shown back row left to right; TSgt. Fairweather, SSgt. ?, Jack Thrasher, Eldon Charles, Bernie Rogers, Robert Lian, Ronald Burt, seated left to right Larry Lancaster, Sonny Selden, and Bob Odem. Photo taken in the summer of 1968 at Otis AFB. My thanks to Larry Lancaster for this image. Color, about 114K, Added 07/25/11.

553rd Electronic Maintenance Squadron
Autopilot Shop

No image currently available. If you have an image you are willing to share please email me at westin@westin553.net

553rd Electronic Maintenance Squadron
Communications Shop

The primary UHF communications equipment on the EC-121R was the ARC-27. There were also ARC-51BX radios on board as well, along with Wilcox 807 VHF and Collins HF radios. Here is an overview of the radio shop, B&W, about 147K. These next two images show Sgt. Charlie Dawson, B&W, about 205K, and an ARC-27 UHF radio under repair, B&W, about 204K. Note the physical size of the radio. My thanks to Arley Hamilton, 553rd EMS Communications shop, for these images. Added 02/16/09.

During the upgrade to EC-121R configuration, the back end electronics were upgraded. Here is an ARC-51BX UHF communications radio on the test bench for alignment and test. Alignment required a number of adjustments, often one adjustment affecting another adjustment. My thanks to Peter Birren, 553rd EMS Radio shop, for this image. B&W, about 161K. Added 03/10/12.

553rd Electronic Maintenance Squadron
Cryptography Shop

No image currently available. If you have an image you are willing to share please email me at westin@westin553.net

553rd Electronic Maintenance Squadron
Electronic Countermeasures (ECM) Shop

No image currently available. If you have an image you are willing to share please email me at westin@westin553.net

553rd Electronic Maintenance Squadron
Instrument Shop

Here are some views of the EMS Instrument shop. This is Instrument shop status board. All instrument shop images are B&W, status board about 131K in size. Next 4 images are of Batcats who worked in the instrument shop. Image 1 Batcat Instrument shop technicians image 1 shows SSgt William Ernest Johns (Sr) in the front, airman leaning against the wall is SMSgt Delmar Sowers, my thanks to Gary Borman for providing SMSgt. Sowers name. Next is Batcat Instrument shop technician image 2, followed by Batcat Instrument shop technician image 3, and Batcat Instrument shop technicians image 4. Images sizes are about 57K, 83K, 89K and 102K respectively. My thanks to William Johns Jr., Son of Batcat William Ernest Johns Sr., who worked the instrument shop at Korat, for sending these images. If anyone can provide names to those Batcats shown in these images please email me. Added 12/12/11, updated 09/05/13.

553rd Electronic Maintenance Squadron
Navigation Shop

This view shows a ARN-21 TACAN unit under repair and alignment at the Korat EMS Nav shop bench. Photo taken in January 1968 showing Ed Thurston, who provided the image, making the adjustments. TACAN, short for Tactical Air Navigation, was the primary source of aircraft position while in flilght. B&W, about 128K. Added 03/16/08.

This view shows the EMS Shop with TSgt. Gornto on the left, and SSgt. Hill on the right. Photo taken in January 1968. My thanks to Ed Thurston who provided the image. B&W, about 101K. Added 03/16/08.

553rd Electronic Maintenance Squadron
Radar Shop

This view shows the APS-42 Radar shop at Korat. Here are the names of those who worked the radar shop. This image shows Jerry Cunning standing next to a APS-42 Radar. APS-42 Radar shop is color, about 58K, Jerry Cunning with radar image is B&W, about 70K. Both images courtesy of Jerry Cunning. Added 02/24/08.

This view shows a APS-42 Radar unit under repair by MSgt. Spencer. Photo taken in January 1968. My thanks to Ed Thurston who provided the image. B&W, about 135K. Added 03/16/08.

553rd Field Maintenance Squadron

The Field Maintenance Squadron (FMS), comprised 3 branches. One the Aero Space Ground Equipment Branch, two the Fabrication Branch, and three the Propulsion Branch. To accomplish this work each branch was divided into specific shops specializing in a particular types of equipment. The individual shop areas follow.

Here is a view of an unusal FMS Display of names who worked the FMS. As individuals assigned to the FMS were about to rotate back to the U.S., they took their name tag off and added to this display. My thanks to Phillip Cameron who provided the image. Color, about 239K. Added 07/26/15.

553rd Field Maintenance Squadron
Aero Repair Shop

Here is a view of the guys who worked the Aero Repair Shop. Front row sitting, Amn Kovall, Sgt thompson (Shop Chief 1969) Rear left to Right Amn Schultz, Sgt. Stafford, Amn Miller, Amn Eperijisi. My thanks to Dan Stafford who provided the image. B&W, about 58K. Added 10/17/11.

553rd Field Maintenance Squadron
Aerospace Ground Equipment (AGE) Shop
Earlier called Ground Power

This image of a newspaper photo of the 553rd FMS AGE shop shows CMSgt. Billie S. Roberts showing General John D. Ryan, PACAF commander how a piece of Aerospace Ground Equipment works. My thanks to Bill Grosick for this image. B&W, about 133K, added 01/15/12.

On the right is TSgt Daigle, on the left is TSgt Bill (Red) Royan. They are in the process of changing an engine in an MD-3 Generator Set. The MD-3 was the AC and DC power source for the aircraft when it was on the ground. My thanks to Bill Grosick for this image. Foto taken Dec. 1967. B&W, about 144K, added 01/17/12.

Here is an image of some ground power equipment under repair. My thanks to Paul Redd for this image. Color, about 77K, added 06/14/12.

553rd Field Maintenance Squadron
Electric Shop

In the shop - this views shows the FMS Electric Shop at Korat where a dc generator is being repaired. Shown left to right are Ron Brunnabend, Charles Martel, Underdown, and Chuck Silverstein with the cigarette on the right. Image courtesy of Peter Eastman. Color, about 52K, added 03/03/02.

553rd Field Maintenance Squadron
Environmental Systems Shop

During the U.S. involvement in Vietnam some of those assigned to the 553rd Reconnaissance Wing were serving in their third war. Read the story of Jarl L. Harris - 3 War Veteran who served in three wars including with the 553rd Reconnaissance Wing, Field Maintenance Squadron, Environmental Shop at Korat. My thanks to author Marlene Browning-Wainscott, Owenton News-Herald Correspondent, and Editor Molly Haines for their permission to publish this article on my homepage. Note that Jarl L. Harris is shown in the photo below during the time he served with 553rd FMS Environmental Shop, photo taken about 1969 provided by Greg Krzyzak. File in PDF format, about 35K, Added 01/27/17.

This is an USAF official photograph of the 553rd FMS Environmental Systems Shop at Korat RTAFB 1968-1971. B&W, about 146K. Seated at the desk is TSgt. Bill Boden NCOIC (see note on this name below), seated at the left side of the desk is SSgt. Storey, standing at the file cabinet is SSgt. Jackson, standing next to the clock is A2C Spears, seated behind the table is SSgt. Maurice Ledoux, and standing behind the table is SSgt. Jarl L. Harris. The environmental shop handled pressurization and air conditioning (which was very important for the crew and for all the electronics in the EC-121R). Here is the back side of the Environmental Systems Shop photo with names. B&W, about 47K. My thanks to Greg Krzyzak for providing the actual photograph, he gave it to me at the 2001 reunion. NOTE - multiple individuals indicate to me the person behind the desk is TSgt Floyd Moody, multiple others indicate it is TSgt. Bill Boden. I left Bill Boden's name in the caption above because it is hand written on the back of the photo Greg provided. My thanks to both Mike Jankowski and Ken Tetrault for information of the NCOIC's name. Added 07/8/01, names last updated 05/23/14.

This "We Maintain Your Cools" drawing which hung in the 553rd FMS Environment Systems Shop. My thanks to Don Elder for sending this image of the drawing. B&W, about 266K, Added 11/06/16.


553rd Field Maintenance Squadron
Hydraulic Shop

No image currently available. If you have an image you are willing to share please email me at westin@westin553.net

553rd Field Maintenance Squadron
Instrument Shop

When the 553rd Reconnaissance Wing first arrived at Korat RTAFB, the instrument shop was assigned to the FMS. Very shortly after arrival the instrument shop was reassigned to the EMS. See section above in the EMS area for images of the instrument shop.

553rd Field Maintenance Squadron
Maintenance Control

No image currently available. If you have an image you are willing to share please email me at westin@westin553.net

553rd Field Maintenance Squadron
Parachute Shop

No image currently available. If you have an image you are willing to share please email me at westin@westin553.net

553rd Field Maintenance Squadron
Propeller Shop

This image, propshop.jpg is a view of the inside of the Prop Shop, another image, propguys.jpg, show the technicians on the hangar floor who kept the propellers working! Here is a list of the Prop Image Names for both images. Images and names provided by Bob Keeyes, who worked on the EC-121R propellers at Korat. Propshop images B&W, about 30K, propguys image about 34K, Added 10/23/01.

An image of the original FMS propeller shop personel 1967 to 1968. Here is a list of the names of the first prop shop personel. My thanks to Vernie Andricks for this image and the names. B&W, about 136K, Added 09/29/08.

Here are two more images showing the First Prop Shop Personel view 1 and First Prop Shop Personel view 2. Both are B&W, about 152K and 129K. Names of the Prop guys shown in the image andricks03.jpg. My thanks to Vernie Andricks for these images, and to Bob Keeyes for the names on image andricks03.jpg. Added 09/29/08.

Here are three more Prop Shop images. First shows Vernie Andricks sitting on a trailer used to move propellers from the shop to the flight line, B&W, about 93K. Next image shows inside the Prop Shop with Vernie Andricks at the hydraulic test stand, B&W, about 114K. Here is an image of the entrance to the Prop Shop with SSgt. John Yingling (earlier misspelled as SSgt. John Umgling), A2C Cobb, and Sgt. Perez. B&W, about 158K. My thanks to Vernie Andricks for these images. My thanks to Chuck Silverstein for correcting my misspelling of Yingling. Added 09/29/08, name updated 06/17/12.

Here is an image of the 1970 Prop Shop crew. In the photo left to right Barry Wood, aka Woody, Harry, Lopez, and Jerry Middendorf. Here is an image of Barry Wood in the barracks. Both images are color, about 61K and 7K respectively. My thanks to Barry Wood for these images. Added 10/14/16.

553rd Field Maintenance Squadron
Propulsion and Recipicating Engine Shop

The FMS Engine Shop originally procured their engines from the states. We started to build up the engines at Korat after arriving, starting from scratch the Reciprocating Engine Build Up Shop. We had no test stand so when we had an engine change we replaced the engine on the aircraft and then had to test it on the wing, making adjustments and checking for leaks prior to releasing the aircraft. This was time a consuming process but with the outstanding mechanics we had made it a fairly rapid engine change. Most of the aircraft had high time engines that had to be replaced.

Dodge Power Wagon used by the 553rd Propulsion shop. Power Wagon's still used a flat head engine when virtually all other U.S. vehicles used overhead valves. My thanks to Phillip Cameron for this image, color about 188K, Added 07/26/15.

Here are two interior views of the Recipicating Engine Shop, view 1, and Recipicating Engine Shop, view 2. Both images are B&W, about 263K, and 31K in size. The Wright R-3350 radial engine was a big engine. My thanks to Philip Sidney for these images. Added 11/24/11.

Here are two views of Recipicating Engine Shop Technicians, view 1, servicing an engine and Recipicating Engine Shop Technician, view 2. As you can see sometimes working on the engine required the engine mechanic to be a contortionist to gain access to the needed area to service the engine. Both images are color, about 274K, and 331K in size. Contact me if you can provide names for these images. My thanks to Ron Hanlin for these images. Added 08/22/12.

About 4 months into the tour we were shipped a reciprocating engine mobile engine test stand for the R-3350 engine. My thanks to Bill Holbrook for this image, color about 206K, Added 01/30/00. Here are two views of the R3350 engine test stand in operation view 1 and here as a R3350 engine is first started on the test stand. Images are B&W, about 43K, and 229K in size. After engine was checked and adjusted on the test stand, using a serviceable propeller, it was mounted on the aircraft. Here are two images of installing the engine after test. View 1 of mounting the engine. Here is View 2 of mounting the engine. B&W, about 210K, and 251K in size. My thanks to Philip Sidney for these 4 images. Engine changes require technicians from the 553rd FMS Recipicating Engine Shop, the Propeller Shop, and from the 553rd OMS flight line mechanics. These 4 images Added 11/20/11.

Image of SSgt. Jack C. Halligan as he departs the blue van used to move between the shop and the flight line. This view shows SSgt. Jack C. Halligan working on an engine. My thanks to Colleen Zuniga, daughter of Batcat Jack Halligan, for these images. Images B&W, about 133K, and 199K in size. Added 03/06/15.

553rd Field Maintenance Squadron
Quality Control Shop

No image currently available. If you have an image you are willing to share please email me at westin@westin553.net

553rd Field Maintenance Squadron
Sheet Metal Shop

When the 553rd Reconnaissance Wing arrived at Korat, conditions were primative. Shown here are views of the first Sheet Metal shop view 1, with another view of the first Sheet Metal shop view 2. B&W, about 146K, and 152K in size. Here is a view of the first Sheet Metal shop crew. Updated Caption - here is a list of the known first sheet metal shop names. My thanks to Phil Miller for providing these names. Names added 10/03/15. My thanks to Paul Redd for this image. Image B&W, about 157K, Added 06/14/12.

A view inside of the Maintenance Hangar looking out at the ramp showing the permanent Sheet Metal area. My thanks to Bob Langenhan for providing this image. Added 07/05/08, B&W, about 54K. Updated Caption - originally the sheet metal shop was located in a large van, with the completion of the large hangar the sheet metal shop was relocated to the hangar. In this interior view looking out you can see a cowling section in the foreground which typically required crack patching and fastener replacement. The items behind the cowling are from right to left a "Straight Brake" used to making straight edge bends of any angle; aluminum sheet metal storage rack, partial sheet; "Rolling Brake" used to make rounded parts, and the bin for whole sheets of metal. My thanks to Phil Miller for providing this update to the caption. Caption updated 10/03/15.

553rd Organizational Maintenance Squadron

The Organizational Maintenance Squadron comprised 5 functions. One the Phase Docks, two the Flight Line, three Aero Repair and Tire, four 780 Equipment, and five Bench Stock.

780 Equipment was safety equipment, such as fire extinguishers, first aid kits, crash axes, tie down rings, other equipment used on the airplane, but not part of the aircraft. Bench Stock was a supply of items used frequently, such as safety wire, cotter pins, instrument lamps, etc. so the OMS crew chief could make repairs quickly without having to go through supply channels making requests for such small, but essential items in triplicate.

Images of OMS work follow.

Maintenance work was accomplished 24 hours per day, 7 days a week. Here is an image of daylight coming as OMS worked through the night preparing aircraft for the next missions. Image provided by Rick Dietly who worked graveyard OMS 1967 to 1968. Added 09/11/12, color, about 63K.

Shown here are 3 views of Gordon Tatro standing next to an EC-121R Engine with the cowling open, Standing on the ground under the engine with the cowling open and Sitting on the engine with the cowling open. NOTE - there is a caption on image tatro08a.jpg which identifies the engine as a "3360-92D radial" engine. The EC-121R was powered by the Wright "turbocompound R-3350-93A-42A" radial engine. Gordon was assigned to the 553rd OMS at Korat. These views show different close up views of the Wright R-3350, 18 cyclinder radial engine which powered by the EC-121R. These images were taken on aircraft 67-21483. Behind Gordon is one of 3 power recovery turbines. B&W, about 48K, 199K and 109K respectively. First added 11/04/01, caption updated 12/15/16.

The 553rd Reconnaissance Wing was a 24 hour a day operation. Here is a night time view of OMS working on an engine. My thanks to Bob Rufo for providing his slide for me to scan. Color, about 96K. Added 11/25/13.

Here are two service images. First is a view of a Connie inside the hangar with number 4 engine cowling open and propeller feathered. Second view if of a Connie on the ramp with the number 2 engine removed waiting for a quick engine change. My thanks to Bob Langenhan for providing this images. Added 07/05/08, both images B&W, about 51 and 45K respectively.

Maintenance crews worked around the clock to keep the EC-121R's flying. Shown here is Jim Barcus, on the right (sitting on the engine), and John Sluka (on the left) servicing a R-3350 Master Control at Night. Note that even at this late hour there is no need for a coat at Korat, Thailand. Image courtsey of Jim Barcus. B&W, about 49K, added 11/08/01.

Engine Change on the Flight Line - the Wright R3350 engine which powered the Lockheed EC-121R was not the most reliable piston enigne built. This first view shows an Engine Just Removed. Note the engine and all accessories are removed at one time. This speeds up an engine change considerably. The second view shows an Engine Being positioned for Installation. Propeller will be installed after the engine is secured. Image courtesy of Peter Eastman. Both the FMS and OMS groups together performed engine and propeller changes. Engine removed image is Color, about 58K, Engine Positioned image is Color, about 68K, added 03/25/02.

Servicing the EC-121R Inside the BIG hangar at Korat, an EC-121R under goes maintenance. Multiple unique service stands are required to gain access to, and to permit inspection of the interior of the left wing. Second image shows the triple tail opened up for inspection. Note the leading edge of the center vertical stabilizer is removed, along with the deicing boot, for better access. This view gives an idea of how high off the ground the maintenance crews had to work to service the EC-121R. Any higher and the Air Force would have no doubt required an altitude card to climb the stands! Both images provided by Paul Albrecht. First image is color about 134KB, second color about 167KB. Added 05/30/04.

The Lockheed Connie's were getting older. Older aircraft require careful inspection to locate problems before they become a safety of flight issue. Batcat OMS found this wing corrosion before flight safety was comprimised. This problem required considerable technical skill to safely repair. My thanks to Bob Rufo for providing his slide for me to scan. Color, about 112K. Added 11/25/13.

Here is a view of the Shark mouth painted EC-121R in the hangar. USAF serial number of the Shark Mouthed EC-121R is 67-21498. My thanks to Bob Ellinwood for this image. Color about 260K. Added 12/08/11.

This view shows an OMS crew on the flight line. Here are the known names of the crew. Please contact me if you can fill in more names. My thanks to Dave Rindone for this image. B&W, about 76K. Added 03/18/06, with names updated 10/27/11.

Vernie Andricks provided this image of a Fuel Truck uploading. OMS handled refueling the EC-121R. Note the EC-121R's Wright R-3350 engines used 115/145 octane aviation fuel. To avoid human error aviation fuels have the different octanes dyed different colors. The 115/145 octane used was dyed purple in color. Other octanes used different colors: 80/87 is red, 91/96 octane is brown, 100/130 octane is green, 100 Low Lead is blue. B&W, about 153K, Added 09/29/08.

193rd Tactical Warfare Squadron
Pennsylvania Air National Guard
EC-121S at Korat RTAFB

For additional information on the 193rd Tactical Warfare Squadron (TWS), Pennsylvania Air National Guard, and their Lockheed EC-121S aircraft see the Task Force Commando Buzz page on this site.

This is an image of the 193rd Consolidated Aircraft Maintenance Squadron of the Pennsylvania Air National Guard. The CAMS provided maintenance techinicians to support the Lockheed EC-121S operations at Korat RTAFB. Not sure who added the two red tennis balls to the sign, however they are not standard. My thanks to Phillip Cameron for sending this image. Color, about 168K, added 07/26/15.

For a 6 month period in 1970 the Pennsylvania Air National Guard flew the Lockheed EC-121S out of Korat. One book I have on the Lockheed Constellation, "Lockheed Constellation," by Peter M. Bowers and Curtis K. Stringfellow, indicates only 5 aircraft were modified to this standard. The EC-121S aircraft were flown and maintained by the Pennsylvania Air National Guard. While at Korat the 553rd Recconaissance Wing provided service facilities. Shown here is a photo of an EC-121S in the hangar undergoing maintenance. Here is another view of an EC-121S on the flight line. Note the unusal antenna, this is not the same as the height finder antenna found on the EC-121D and EC-121H, and also note that no tip tanks are fitted. Both images provided by Greg Krzyzak. These EC-121S images added 09/05/01, updated 07/07/03.

This image shows two EC-121S aircraft on the flight line at Korat RTAFB. This image was taken from the window of a 2 baht bus going into Korat city. The EC-121S aircraft are on the right with the white tops. My thanks to John Tomany for sending this image. Color, about 29K, added 06/29/99, updated 12/12/14.


Please contact me if you can provide additional images
or information about 553rd Maintenance at Korat RTAFB

If you have additional maintenance photographs or other information you are willing to share, please contact me. I'd like to include more images and information about Batcat maintenance. Send to Webmaster Larry Westin via email to westin@westin553.net. Added 07/07/14.



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